Augmented historical maps

There is a set of old city maps of Turku (Finland) at Kapsi. As a resident, those maps are interesting in their own right, but when they are georeferenced, a whole new world of opportunities open up.

So I opened up QuantumGIS and georeferenced the maps of Turku from 1888 and 1950, and overlayed the current transportation network on the hand-drawn maps from the past. It’s nice to notice that the old main transportation pathways (bridges, roads to other cities) and landmarks are still in place and in everyday use!

City map of Turku from 1888 augmented with transportation network from 2015
City map of Turku from 1888 augmented with transportation network from 2015 (click to enlarge).

 

The city map of Turku from 1950 augmented with transportation network from 2015
The city map of Turku from 1950 augmented with transportation network from 2015 (click to enlarge)

Continue reading Augmented historical maps

Train travel delays in Finland

VR Group is currently the only company providing passenger train services in Finland, with less than optimal success in timeliness. Some time ago VR released a service for tracking train status and location in real-time. The service also informs how much each train is delayed.

The founder of Junainfo, Mikko Jokinen, provided me with a chunk of archived data from Jan-Feb 2015. The data has wealth of potential for analysis, but for a quick look here is an animation that illustrates the pulse of trains that VR has tracked for some weeks in January 2015.

 

Public transportation accessibility level for Helsinki metropolitan area

The figure above shows the public transport accessibility level for the Helsinki metropolitan area in 2009 (click for a larger view). The accessibility level is a subjective measure indicating the usefulness of the public transportation for commuting between the residential districts and the service and supply oriented areas. In the image the red colors indicate areas where public transportation is the most effective for everyday commuting. At the blue areas the public transportation is the least effective, and the yellow indicates the areas of moderate effectivity. Continue reading Public transportation accessibility level for Helsinki metropolitan area

Public transportation routing data

The public transport planning and execution within the Helsinki metropolitan area (Finland) is organized by the Helsinki Metropolitan Area Council (YTV). YTV has set up a very useful web interface for checking the public transportation timetables and routes, and some time ago I created a crawler for collecting traveltime data for Traveltime maps. With slight modifications, the crawler lends itself for plotting the public transport routes in the Helsinki metropolitan area (year 2009):

routemap_smallAs a side product, the usage of each routing point was produced. The image below illustrates the usage pattern (point size reflects the number of routes via the point):

routepoints_small

Tortuosity

The crawler software also produces the tortuosities of the transportation routes. Tortuosity is a numerical value expressing how much the route differs from the straight line joining the endpoints of the route. Thus, tortuosity is an indicator of the effectiveness of the routing plan. The straight line between the endpoints is the most effective path and has the tortuosity value 1, and the tortuosity increases as the route deviates from the straight line: when the distance between points A and B is 1 km, a route of tortuosity 2 has the length of 2 km and a route of tortuosity 7 has the length 7 km. The value of tortuosity is ultimately bounded from below by the road network tortuosity.

Below is a plot combining the tortuosity data fetched for working days (blue dots) and Sundays (red dots), overlaid by the road network tortuosities (grey dots):

tortuosities